Boner Math And No One Is On The Radio

This really isn’t an erection dysfunction website. It’s just that my attempts to cure my ED are very much front of mind. When I went to the urologist to discuss my problem, I expected the new injections to work the first time. As I’ve learned, it’s a pretty long process for me to find the correct dose. That process is interesting in that my decision of what works for me is based on two very sexual factors.

The first is how hard the injection makes me. The second is how long I stay hard. If the erection lasts four hours, it’s a medical emergency that requires a visit to the ER. There’s a third factor. The drug is expensive. It costs me $133 for 5 ml. It expires about ninety days after I buy it. Each increase in dose means I get fewer erections for my money. The balancing act is for me to get the firmest erection that lasts less than four hours for the lowest cost. It’s an engineering problem!

My last experiment produced a very bendable woody that lasted a bit over two hours. It wasn’t stiff enough to insert. However, Mrs. Lion could firm it up more by sucking it. The dose was .35 ml, which would yield fourteen boners per bottle at a cost of $9.50 each. I would like to do better than that. My next attempt will be with .40 ml. I’m hoping that will firm things up. If it does, we’ll get 12 boners per bottle at a cost of $11 each. Even if I have to increase the dose further, I doubt it will go past .5ml, which would yield ten boners at a cost of $13 each.

Hopefully, I won’t get into a situation where I need to visit the ER. There is one more factor: time. The drug expires in 90 days. If I get twelve boners from a bottle, I need to use a dose about once a week. If the dose goes up to .50 ml, then it’s once every nine days. Both numbers are within our usual orgasm schedule. I have no idea when we will use up the first bottle. That’s the one we have used for experiments.

ham radio lion

I’ve been studying for my amateur radio exams. I’m scheduled to be tested on Friday. I bought a handheld ham radio that works on two of the VHF/UHF bands. I’ve had it scanning both bands so that i can listen in on how our local hams talk with one another. So far, I’ve only found one very short conversation. That’s disappointing. It means that I don’t live close enough to the action. The handheld radio can’t pick up any activity.

The problem is almost certainly the little antenna I have on the device. It’s not the small rubber one that came with the radio. I followed online advice and purchased a much better one. It’s still not good enough. Or is it? Can it be that there is no real activity around here on those bands? It’s possible. There are only 750,000 hams in the US.

I decided to get into this arcane hobby in order to “prep” for inevitable natural disasters. I figure that cell phones will become useless if we have an earthquake, volcanic eruption (we are surrounded by volcanoes), wildfires, or floods. Handheld ham radios have proven to be lifesavers in disasters for decades.  If Mrs. Lion and I get separated, if we both have ham radios available, the network of hams around the world can help us find one another, or rescue us if trapped.

There is a drawback to this plan. Mrs. Lion isn’t inclined to learn technical stuff. She’s absolutely capable of it. Her job requires her to have extremely detailed knowledge of a wide range of difficult technical (medical) issues. I have to convince her to take the eight-to-ten-hour study course and then pass her test.

In the meantime, I want to connect with the local amateur radio community. That’s not going to be possible if I can’t hear any of them. I may need to set up an outdoor antenna. Yuck. Regardless, if we have a pair of handheld radios and are licensed to use them, we have some extra security in the event of an emergency.

How’s this for a post? No one got teased, and no one got spanked. We are both having fun anyway.