clothespins on balls

We are having a quiet weekend. Mrs. Lion didn’t feel very well on Friday and Saturday. We slept late, and she took it easy. I slept until 11 on Sunday morning. That’s very unusual for me. Mrs. Lion felt better on Sunday and caught up on unpacking and laundry. She is also excavating in our still-packed boxes for our stew pot. We have the makings for beef stew. i’m hoping to make some. It’s cool and damp out; perfect weather for beef stew. We have a great recipe for it.

If Mrs. Lion and I have the energy, there may be some BDSM fun later. She unearthed the toy bag that she used in our trailer. She said, “There ought to be some clothespins in there.”

Uh oh. Sounds like an Edex injection and lots of pinching clothespins on my cock and balls. OK, we both like those clothespin sessions. I think Mrs. Lion’s record is 45 covering my tender bits.

The WordPress sex nazis closed down one of the blogs I recommend, Our Bottoms Burn. Fortunately, the blogger maintains a supplementary version of the blog on Blogger. The link on our site now points to the Blogger blog.  We wish him well and hope he can restore his blog on a provider who isn’t allergic to sexual images. The idiots at WordPress.com are on a crusade to shut down any explicit sexual content that they host. They aren’t mature enough to understand the difference between sex blogging and commercial porn. I wonder how many of our readers are sex nazis from WordPress. It’s OK, I won’t tell your bosses what you do at night.

In case you don’t know, our posts are also available as podcasts. The most recent 500 are carried by every major provider including Google, Apple, and Amazon Music. It’s helpful if you have limited vision like me. I’m considering putting an audio player here to help visually impaired friends. We also offer versions of the blog (logo on upper right of your page) to help people with limited vision. Computer translations of our blog are available in 18 languages (see flags on top navigation bar). We’re committeed to doing whatever we can to make our blog available to as many people as possible.

nazi wordpress logo

Most blogs, ours included, count other bloggers as some of our most faithful readers. It’s a sort of secret fraternity/sorority in that we rarely identify ourselves to other bloggers. The exception to this is when our little community is under attack. About ten years ago, Google, the owner of Blogger.com, notified sex bloggers that they would no longer permit their content. Fortunately, Google relented to the wave of protests and welcomes sexual content.

The largest blog host is WordPress.com. WordPress is also the leading blogging software. The software is free and not subject to any form of censorship. WordPress.com is the commercial side of the company. The blogging software is free. You can get a small blog for free from WordPress.com. Larger blogs with more features cost money. Unfortunately, the people at WordPress.com are sex nazis. They will shut down any blog with “explicit” sexual content. Our blog is not welcome there. The nazis even kill paying customers if they shop a penis or a vagina.

The nazis also sell a WordPress plugin called Jetpack. This software offers backups, scans, improved commenting, and other nice additions to a WordPress blog. About a month ago I received an email telling me that unless I removed explicit sexual content, my subscription to Jetpack would be canceled. I chose to delete Jetpack and replace it with other free plugins.

Most bloggers aren’t very technical and would have a lot of trouble building a website on their own. So they knuckle under to the sex nazis at WordPress.com. I am deeply disturbed by censorship. I don’t think kiddie porn or other illegal content has a place on the Web, but beyond that I believe anything else has a right to exist. Sexual content is certainly free speech and protected under the US Constitution.

Sadly, most bloggers don’t realize that the technical bar is very low if they want to blog without censorship. Google WordPress hosting, and you will find a ton of reasonably priced vendors who will give you a turnkey WordPress site at a low cost without nazi censorship. If you are willing to use your search engine to help you learn some Linux basics, you can self-host in the cloud free from the nazi bastards at WordPress.com.

I’m very surprised that WordPress.com is populated by nazis. It makes no sense. Does their personnel department look for sexually repressed Republicans? It absolutely amazes me. In the past, I’ve had to ask some plugin providers for help implementing their products. They needed access to our site to help me. Without exception, they were happy with our content. Only the WordPress.com nazis were offended.

Fortunately, we don’t have to allow the nazi censors to redact sex from our world. If you are a blogger, you have options. If you need help, let me know.

Every so often, someone asks me how we manage our blog. It’s tempting to want to express yourself on the Internet. Blogging is a fun way to do that. If you want to create a sexually oriented blog, there are some issues to consider. There are two major providers of free blogs: blogger.com and wordpress.com. Both offer free, easy-to-setup blogging websites. WordPress.com prohibits sexual material and is very efficient at shutting blogs off without warning. Blogger does allow most sexual content. However, you will get a warning page in front of your site. Google owns Blogger and has threatened to shut down sexual sites in the past. They changed their minds and decided to allow them.

Our site is set up on a private Internet service provider (ISP). We pay for a shared server in the cloud. We got the necessary base software installed as part of the server. We had to set up and add other software we might need. The way we did it requires some knowledge of Linux administration and other technical skills. Given the size of our site, it was the only affordable way to go. More on our techy stuff at the end of this post.

There are many independent pay-to-play ISPs out there. Their services range in price from about five bucks a month up to, well, a lot. I’ve worked with two. Both offer good service at fair prices. For the record, I don’t get any money from either for suggesting their offerings.

The simplest to use and one of the cheapest is EasyWP on https://www.namecheap.com. I’ve been working with this company for many years. They are one of the world’s largest domain registrars and offer some nice additional services. One is EasyWP. EasyWP Turbo is only $68 for the first year and less than $100/year after that. The price includes unlimited bandwidth, free software installation, and 24/7 customer support. They have a cheaper tier, but it requires you to buy an SSL certificate (needed to do the “https:” instead of “http:”). It’s robust enough to handle a pretty busy blog. We used this service for a while.

The other ISP I’ve used is Hostgator.com. They are one of the largest web-hosting ISPs in the world. Their starter WordPress package is $5.95/month for the first three years (paid in advance). It goes way up after that. I’ve used them for vanilla blogs. I have no idea about whether or not they care about your content. They also offer very good tech support.

There are hundreds of other ISPs. I have used a couple I didn’t like. If you build a WordPress blog, there are excellent migration plugins available. Moving from one ISP to another is fairly simple and painless. It’s easy to move when the sale price period is over. Also, register your domain name even if you use Blogger or the free WordPress service. If you don’t, someone else might.

How our site works

This site lives in the AWS cloud. We are on an EC2 WordPress instance. Unlike Hostgator and Namecheap, we have full control of our virtual server. Our instance is 2 CPUs with 4GB ram and 80 GB solid state disk. We have installed database caching software and plugin (Redis) to support our site. We also run Matomo web statistics.

Our site is served via the AWS Cloudfront CDN (Content Delivery Network). This consists of more than 70 servers around the world that deliver our content to visitors. That’s free. This setup requires lots of reading and tinkering. There is some command line work installing and maintaining the non-WordPress software. It’s more expensive than Namechap or HostGator but a lot more powerful.

I don’t spend a ton of time managing our system. It took a while to set up. I just finished migrating to a different technical architecture on AWS. It wasn’t terribly hard to do, just lots of reading and finicky steps. We will save a few bucks a month with the new arrangement. Performance seems a little better too.

I don’t want to appear rude, so I’ll say this publically, I almost never answer “Contact Us” messages that want advice of one sort or another.  Like many other bloggers, I receive a fair number of this sort of queries. I’m not sure why people believe that journalists (bloggers are journalists) should be expected to provide personalized service to individual readers.

It isn’t that I think I am too good to help out. It’s just that writing an almost-daily post takes a lot of time and effort. I don’t have the time or desire to reply individually to people I’ve never met. By the way, none of those people ever express any interest in us. They want advice on chastity and FLR. Most don’t even take the time to do a site search to see if their questions had already been answered in posts.

Occasionally, someone sends an interesting email that gets my attention. I do answer those. I understand how hard it is to find advice on these subjects. When we first got started, I sent a contact us email to a blogger. He never answered.

The online world is a strange place. Bloggers, like us, share intimate details of our lives. We aren’t compensated for our writing. We do it because we want to. Some of us actually pay for the facilities to publish what we write. Most blogs get very few readers. We are lucky. Quite a few people read what we write.

The people who send demanding emails wanting personal advice tend to come to us via Google or other search engines. Based on what they write, I don’t think they bothered to read a single line on our site. They just click the “Contact” button and expect free help. Our regular readers offer comments to our posts, and if they have questions, they ask them in that public forum. I love answering comments…well, most comments. Some comments are obvious attempts to solicit advice without reading our content.

Speaking of content, bloggers jealously guard their ownership of their audience. Most will never mention another blog, much less post a link to it. That’s dumb. All of us are connected by omnipresent search engines. Type a query about “male chastity,” and you will see pretty much everyone writing about it. The same is true about any subject. I don’t have time to read too many blogs like ours, but when I find one that has something to say that I want to share, I feel fine about publishing a link to it. They almost never return the favor.

Anyone who owns a website can get detailed statistical data about who is reading it. Google provides free, detailed information. Others do too. We have a dedicated server running analytical software that counts each visit and pageview. We don’t know who reads our blog. Our readers’ identity is safe. We do know how many people read each page and visit on any given day. We know what country they come from. We also know if they clicked a link on another site or search engine to find us.

This information is useful. It helps us understand what our audience wants to read. It lets us know how many people visit and how many pages they read on each visit. Right now, our average visitor reads between two and three pages. Almost half navigate directly to our site. They aren’t coming from search engines or other website links. I like that a lot. It means we are a destination. ChatGPT includes our site in its data model. Almost 40,000 references are in it.

All this is encouraging. It’s fun to be well-known. It doesn’t buy us anything. We have nothing to sell and we don’t solicit donations or subscriptions.  One day we may have to, but not now. You may wonder what we want in contacts. I would love to hear ideas about what might be interesting for us to write about. It’s great when we learn about something new. That’s always wonderful fun.